1. Welcome to Nitro & Tracker Owners! Join today, registration is easy!

    You can register using your Google, Facebook, or Twitter account, just click here.

Reloading

Thread in 'Firearms Chat' started by AirForce, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. AirForce

    AirForce Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    828
    Likes Received:
    48
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    Location:
    Smyrna TN
    Well after much research last night I determined that reloading would just not be feasible for me. Equipment I want (progressive press), dies, etc would cost a grand (for the Dillon Press XL650 and assorted stuff I'd want with it) and that's before I buy bullets, primers, powder etc. I can buy bulk 223 for $259 per thousand, 9mm for $239 per thousand, and 45acp for $359 per thousand. So a lot of ammo for the price of a press. I figure I probably wouldn't shoot more than couple thousand at most, rest I'd hoard for when SHTF time. I ruled out the single press, as that's just too time consuming and would give my arms a workout I don't need although the idea of shooting my own stuff intrigues me and definitely would be a fun hobby.

    Sure is a shame though there's no decent 200-600 yd ranges in my area though. I use to train/certify folks at indoor range in Nashville years ago but much prefer outdoor ranges. I realize most folks like being comfy when shooting, but I prefer outdoor unless you're in the business of routing out bad guys in buildings. Besides the Stones River range in Antioch run by the State, there's a private range south of Franklin and one in Manchester TN (hours drive) so leaning towards the private range south of Franklin - yearly fee of $90 and my wife could shoot for free if I'm there with her. State one wants 101 bucks a year per person or $5.50 for 2 hours per person and its only open 3 days a week, so again the Franklin wins (closed Tues and Thursday and the 1st weekend of every month). So I like the idea of going say on Wed when others are working.

    After the heart surgery is over with, I might reconsider next year - depending on how much I shoot, but I will be saving all my brass. I bought a brass catcher to put on the AR. Then I'm gonna get a magnetic sweeper to help police the brass we shoot. (from auto pistols).

    Does anyone here reload 410 shorshells??
     
  2. Greg Meyer

    Greg Meyer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,834
    Likes Received:
    17
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2001
    My son and I share our reloading "stuff" and have 8 different presses.... one 12ga Mec and a Lee 2000 for .45 acp are our only progressive presses. Everything else is single stage (Mec 600 is kind of a hybrid for .20ga). It is time well spent, slow or not, when we spend an evening loading anywhere from 25 to 200or 300 rounds. We don't reload to save money just to have a hobby we enjoy that creates the ammo just the way we want it. We load .38/.357, .40S&W, .45 acp, .222. .223, .257R, 7mm RM, .308, 30-06, 7.65x53, .300 WM, .338 WM, 12 and 20 ga.

    I know that Glen, Rich, Fatrap, and I are not the only ones that reload.
     
  3. rbstern

    rbstern Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    AF, let me talk you back into it...

    Say hello to the Lee Classic Turret Press:

    [​IMG]

    This is the best press Lee has ever made, and IMHO, it's one the best presses ever made, period. Extremely well built.

    It converts between a single stage press and an automatic indexing turret press in less than thirty seconds. It swaps between large and small primers in less than thirty seconds. A caliber change is the cost of the dies + the cost of an extra turret insert (less than $50 per cartridge/caliber). If you have a set of dies in a turret, already adjusted and ready to swap in, a caliber change takes thirty seconds. Doesn't matter if you are swapping between pistol and rifle. Still takes about thirty seconds.

    For pistol cartridge loading, I crank out about 200 rounds per hour, which is probably about half the rate you'd get on a true progressive machine. The rounds are consistent and excellent.

    The best part? It costs about $100. $200 if you buy it in a kit with accessories.

    To keep the consumables part of reloading inexpensive, there are a couple of strategies:

    1) Cast your own bullets. Another hobby altogether, but the key to making REALLY cheap ammo. My 38 special reloads, made with salvaged lead (mostly wheel weights), cost 2 to 3 cents per loaded round. Yes, you read that right.

    2) Buy in bulk. You have to buy powder in 8lb jugs, primers by the 5,000 to 10,000 count, scrounge, look for surplus, etc.

    Happy to guide you through doing it cheap, if you want to go down this road.
     
  4. AirForce

    AirForce Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    828
    Likes Received:
    48
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    Location:
    Smyrna TN
    well now I kinda like that idea, 45, 40 for sure. I'd have to think about the 223. I'll do some research on that later.
     
  5. Greg Meyer

    Greg Meyer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,834
    Likes Received:
    17
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2001
    Another benefit besides cost is the sheer fun of reloading.....
     
  6. paulbritt43

    paulbritt43 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Location:
    kentucky


    YES THE LEE TURRET PRESS IS WHAT I USE AND I RELOAD EVERYTHING I SHOOT, AND IT WORKS WELL WITH ALL CALIBARS
     
  7. Shawn

    Shawn Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    I have the same Lee press. I still buy bulk .223 tho, I just don't find it worth the time. I load .338LM and .308.

    Everything else just doesn't see enough use/cost savings to reload.
     

Share This Page