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How do YOU approach post-spawn conditions??

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Bill McElroy

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Here's good question to ponder,....what do you do when it's really tough?!!....Guides?? What do you have your clients do different vs. 2 weeks ago when it was easy?!!.....
Mac
 

Parrotth3ad _

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I use the net more, just throw on a few 1oz egg weights, tie it on, cast it out and you'll have yourself a boat load in no time.... :)

But in reality... think slower, deeper.... and when I actually find something that works, I'll let ya know. I fish Smith Lake in north/central Alabama, It's a deep, clear lake with nil for vegitation, most deep structure has been put out and maintained by fishermen over the years. Find some deep structure in 20 to 30 ft on a point, next to a break line and work it GOOD AND SLOW. Slow roll a Ledge Buster (1 or 2 oz spinnerbait with a colorado blade) in dark colors at night. A Texa$$ rigged finess worm in black/chartruse will also pick up some fish. But when things get REALLY tough, throw the net at'm :) Fishing my Wednesday night club T tonight, I'll let ya know if any of this actually works in the morning.
 

Rob LaMoy

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Good question Mac. It's one we ask ourselves every year. It seems the post spawn blues are affecting you as well. I think the key to remember is that big fish don't get big by being easily accessible. When the spawn is over, big smallies go deep. The males will stay another week to guard the nest and that can be great action, but the females run back out to about 10-12 ft near drop offs to deeper water. The key for me has always been to fish either real slow, or real fast for reaction strikes. More emphasis on the real slow. Very natural colors. Again, I swear by the grub and often after the cast, I will not move the line for sometimes up to a whole minute. Then when you pick up the slack, your line is 25 yards away from where you cast it, hence fish on! I down scale to, light line with a long fast rod that absorbs the shock and helps keep fish on with only 6 lb line. Largemouth are whole different deal. Loners stay shallow on docks, trees etc. But again the schoolers and many bigger fish will follow the points out to deeper water. Try a carolina rig on the outside (deepside) of weed edges. Again, fish it slow. Plus I love jerkbaits. either rogues or huskys. The entire action provokes reaction strikes. There is something about a wounded minnow look that big bass just can't pass up if it's presented properly. Just keep the faith man, the summer bite will be on soon. Besides, it's lulls like post spawn that make prespawn so great. It it were Christmas everyday......you know the rest. Hope this helps. I don't claim to know much, but I share what I can.
Rob
 

Pierre Voisine

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Well, my techniques are as outlined by Rob. I can always be found looking for the odd largemouth under docks, trees slop etc., so post spawn does not really affect me that much. I'll be the first to admit that I need to work on my deep water fishing also, but I'm doing alright so it does not seem to be a priority right now.

Pierre
 

Bill McElroy

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I do that too Pierre, but the last time a largemouth bag ever won a tournament on St.Clair was years ago!!!
I only fish for largeheads when i go inland or if the smallie bite is dreadful!! (Kinda like last weekend!.LOL) Sure miss those smallies for that week or two they decide to "vacate the water system!!"...hahaa....take care folks,..I'll be off line from tomorrow night through the 5th,.....back then!! Adios and tight lines to everyone!!
Seeya
Mac
 

Dan J.

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Within a couple weeks of the last full moon spawning cycle, I pull out to the longest points within 100 or so yards of the spawning area. I'll work the longest points from the spawning area on out until the creek hits the main lake. Submerged islands and humps are good too when they move out of the creeks. I throw topwaters and soft jerkbaits. My home lake, Lanier, is predominately spotted bass, however we have been regularly catching big spots (5lbs. and up!) two casts off of these long tapering points. Setting up my 929 in 30-40ft and drifting with the wind to cover the point from different angles produces excellent catches of spawned out new schoolers ready to feast up from all the Spring baby making. On extremely clear water conditions I rarely use a depth finder or trolling motor as these fish spook easy. Noise is your enemy with big spotted bass. Brush or wood close to spawning areas are good temporary holding areas, but those long points are where they're headed to meet up with the gang and hit the buffet. Fall back on the wood and brush close to the spawning areas, especially when the weather turns or a surprize storm pops up. This works for me pretty well throughout the Summer. Sometimes you have to wade through a bunch of stripers, though. Hope it helps.
 

Jon Puhalski

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Post spawn smallies--- If you know where they spawn, look behind you towards open water. They're still fairly close by but are suspended. Try a Spook or a Slug-Go out over open water that may be 20 feet (relative) deep. If there is a major point nearby to the spawn areas, odds are they are bunched up all around it. Relating to the point, but not physicaly holding on it. Order up some Sweet Water Chubs from Northern Bass Supply over in New Hampshire. Smallies will be tearing those things up when keying on small baitfish.
 

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